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Posts Tagged ‘change’


What better way to celebrate Canada Day than to flash the fireworks of July 1 onto the 4 Quadrants of Canada’s cohort of Integral Leaders?

©2014 Aboriginal Nations Education, Greater Victoria School Board, BC, Canada Artist Jamin Zurowski Bear/UL. Wolf /LL. Raven/UR. Salmon/LR.   This Totem is a Gift used with permission on this Canada Issue. Please do reproduce without © Permission.

©2014 Aboriginal Nations Education, Greater Victoria School Board, BC, Canada
Artist Jamin Zurowski
Bear/UL. Wolf /LL. Raven/UR. Salmon/LR.
This Totem is a Gift used with permission on this Canada Issue. Please do reproduce without © Permission.

A whole Quadrivium of Integral Leaders were featured in the Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue at the beginning of 2015. But the plenitude of contributors and the depth of their insights deserves a special reminder today.

Click here to read the Profiles of all the Authors of the Canada Issue – Integral Leadership Review

Here is the Table of Contents in the Canada Issue – with links to all the contributions – including the original 4 Quadrant aboriginal Totem artwork of the Cover (with poetry, thought pieces, research reports, organizational histories, pedagocial principles for teaching leaders, environmental and sustainability insights, inspiring quotations, in-depth interviews … and more):

Cover

1/15 – Cover

Editor

2/15 – Cover

Editor

Leading Comments

1/15 – A Totem for Curating a Story of Leadership in Canada

Marilyn Hamilton

2/15 – From Totem Guides and Lock Masters to World Legacy Light

Marilyn Hamilton

 

Leadership Quote

1/15 – Marshall McLuhan 

2/15 – Adrienne Clarkson, 26th Governor General of Canada (1999-2005)

Lead Poem

1/15 – Lead Poem

Tim Merry

Leadership Coaching Tips

1/15 – Leading Generative Change

Tam Lundy

2/15 – It’s not just what you do, but also how you think!

Natasha Mantler

Fresh Perspective

1/15 – Integral Coaching Canada with Laura Divine and Joanne Hunt

Marilyn Hamilton

2/15 – Dialogic Development: a Conversation with Gervase Bushe

Russ Volckmann

Leading Self

1/15 – Inching Towards Leaderless Leading

Edith Friesen

1/15 – Re-membering My Inherent Wilderness

Beth Sanders

Leading Others

1/15 – Is True Integral Leadership Possible?

Linda Shore

2/15 – Deep Presencing: Illuminating New Territory at the Bottom of the U

Leading Organizations

1/15 – Building Water Leaders and Waterpreneurs

Julia Fortier and Karen Kun

1/15 – Giving birth to Authentic Leadership in Action

Michael Chender

Leading Cultures

1/15 – A Circle of Aiijaakag, a Circle of Maangag: Integral Theory and Indigenous Leadership

Janice Simcoe

Leading World

1/15 – Integral Transformation of Value Chains: One Sky’s Integral Leadership Program in the Brazil Nut Value Chain in Peru and Bolivia

Gail Hochachka

2/15 – How ARE We To Go On Together? Our Evolutionary Crossroads

Brian and Mary Nattrass

Continuous LearningContinuous Learning

1/15 – Integral Dispositions and Transdisciplinary Knowledge Creation

Sue L. T. McGregor

1/15 – The Long and Winding Road: Leadership and Learning Principles That Transform

Brigitte Harris and Niels Agger-Gupta

2/15 – From Practice to Praxis – as Transformative Education: Leading at the Integral/Professional Interface?

Ian Wight

2/15 – Will the Next Buddha be a Sangha? Responding to the Call to Influence the Future of Collaboration

Rebecca Ejo Colwell

Book Reviews

1/15 – The Pulse of Possibility – A Retrospective Review of the Work of Bruce Sanguin

Trevor Malkinson

2/15 – (Re)Joining the Conversation: Commenting on Integral Voices on Sex, Gender, and Sexuality: Critical Inquiries

Diana Claire Douglas

Column

1/15 – Integral Design Leadership: Healthcare Design as Extraordinary Service: An Interview with Peter Jones

Lisa Norton

Poetry Gallery

1/15 – 1. Forgotten Places

Tim Merry

1/15 – 2. What’s It Gonna Take to Stay Awake?

Tim Merry

1/15 – 3. Thank You

Tim Merry

1/15 – 4. Build the Arks (King Kong Song)

Tim Merry

2/15 – 1. The Mother

Tim Merry

2/15 – 2. Human Family Tree

Tim Merry

2/15 – 3. Superman

Tim Merry

2/15 – 4. Switch it on

Tim Merry

Notes from the Field

1/15 – Integral City Development in the Russian City of Izhevsk

Eugene Pustoshkin

 

 

We wish you a Happy Canada Day of Reading and Inspiration – with Gratitude to  all the Integral Leaders in Canada.

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When Integral City is asked to work with cities, inevitably the invitation comes from leaders who have in mind the wellbeing of their city.

Integral City Compass

Integral City Compass

Tam Lundy’s leadership tip (offered in Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue offered a Leadership Tip on Generative Change) explains this impulse in terms of the desire of the leaders to generate change through both integral thinking and practice.

Tam’s key pointing out instructions for generativity align well with Integral City’s 12 Intelligences.

  • Tam taps into the Integral City Contexting Intelligences that create the conditions for wellbeing at all scales. She frames this as Salutogenesis – the wellbeing of the city that arises because it is complex, adaptive, and full of life. Contexting Intelligences encompass Ecosphere Intelligence, Emergent Intelligence and Living Intelligence along with the Integral Framework.  Salutogenesis gives cities a natural drive to survive, respond to life conditions and thrive. When leaders make the life-sourcing assumption that the city seeks a natural state of wellbeing, then important technical and adaptive solutions underpin but don’t override the wellbeing of the city.
  • Leaders who work with developmental lenses realize that in order to create conditions that support healthy development in people, communities and organizations at all stages of life, requires Strategic Intelligences that embrace Inquiry, Navigating and Meshworking Together leaders who use these three strategies impact the whole city and create solutions that can be implemented in natural steps in service to the wellbeing of all.
  • The quality that Lundy calls Dialectical seems to relate most to the Inquiry Intelligence. Leaders who undertake a dialectical inquiry have the courage to challenge the “thesis” of accepted dogma – such as, with the increase of cars, we must build more highways. Jane Jacob’s classic challenge to this assumption offered a contradictory perspective – or “antithesis” – if you build more highways you will just get more cars and it will be a never-ending dilemma. City leaders who practised Inquiry Intelligence continued with the dialectical process and emerged a “synthesis” – if you build cities for people instead of cars, then many more mobility solutions become available – such as public transportation, ski lifts and walking.
  • Leaders who use the Integral City Compass to think and act intelligently at the city scale, generate the capacity of integrating the AQAL dimensions of the city. This Integrative attitude, enables leaders to situate their thinking and actions using the five Integral City maps. As Lundy notes, this enables leaders to “connect the dots among all of the interconnected, interdynamic and irreducible factors that support thriving” in the city.
  • The last quality that Lundy points to, aligns completely with Integral City’s Evolutionary Intelligence. Leaders who recognize the city as a living, complex adaptive social system, gain strength from seeing the evolutionary impulse at the very centre of the city (and the compass they use to make decisions and design strategies for a future that is preferred), because with an evolutionary life purpose, each city has the opportunity to be in service to wellbeing of the whole world.

As Tam Lundy notes, it is the natural inclination of integrally-informed leaders, to generate change capacities. Integral City Intelligences can be learned and practiced by all city leaders increasing the chances for city thrivability.

Tam Lundy’s ideas on generative change, and their practical application, are explored more fully in her short e-book, Generative Change: A Practical Primer.

This blog is one of a series that explores the relevance and application of ideas to the Integral City, in the articles published in the Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue, 2015, curated and Guest Edited by Marilyn Hamilton.

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Out beyond the smart city, out beyond the resilient city,

Lives the Integral City.

Integral City Thinking

Integral City Thinking

Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue offered a Leadership Tip on Generative Change, by Tam Lundy, that acted as a Guide to appreciating all the articles. Tam’s Tip gave the reader an energy boost as you passed through the Totem Entry Way to help you focus and harvest the significance of each and all the leadership contributions on offer in the issue.

Tam’s ideas on Technical, Adaptive and Generative Change offered particularly cogent recommendations for global cities – whether they be Smart, Resilient or Integral.

Smart Cities tend to use technical solutions to address first order change. As identified by Spiral Dynamics, first order change requires support for maintaining, adjusting or improving the status quo. (Think more data banks, driverless cars, faster Wi-Fi.)

Resilient Cities tend to use adaptive solutions that address mid-order change. As identified by Spiral Dynamics, such change addresses systemic adaptations, mitigations and restorations.  (Think urban food security, reduction of greenhouse gases, daylighting streams.)

Integral Cities seek to generate solutions that meet second-order change. As identified by Spiral Dynamics, these changes address a greater order of magnitude of problems than has ever been encountered before. (The military have dubbed these kinds of circumstances as VUCAvolatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous). Approaches to “VUCA-stances” demand that city leaders open up new mindsets, redefine city paradigms, and emerge new potentials for living systems not yet dreamed or tried. (Think cities as Gaia’s Reflective Organs, city as human hive, Planet of Cities as collective intelligence network.)

Integral City leaders use both Smart and Resilient solutions – in their appropriate contexts. In fact Generative Change approaches enable Integral City thinking to emerge – because they include and build on both Smart and Resilient Solutions – and step into a zone where they can act effectively to align first order technical problems with Smart City solutions and mid-order adaptive problems with Resilient City Solutions.

But Integral City leaders go beyond merely aligning technical and adaptive solutions and seek to discover for their cities how to align the very source of City Wellbeing, with City Purpose, Collective Vision and Strategies for thriving.

Leaders who follow Lundy’s Generative Change Tip, venture out beyond the smart city, out beyond the resilient city, into the Integral City. They create a Field … we can meet them there.

References:

Beck, D., & Cowan, C. (1996). Spiral Dynamics: Mastering Values, Leadership and Change. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers.

Hamilton, M. (2008). Integral City: Evolutionary Intelligences for the Human Hive. Gabriola Island BC: New Society Publishers.

This blog is one of a series that explores the relevance and application of ideas to the Integral City, in the articles published in the Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue, 2015, curated and Guest Edited by Marilyn Hamilton.

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Humans and the cities we have created are permanently locked into a never-ending learning cycle, to create ever more complex adaptations to protect increasingly more complex cities.

Integral Life PlanetCity2

In the Integral City 2.0 Online Conference (2012), five critical threats to human populations in cities were identified: climate, energy, water, food and finance (Hamilton et al., 2013; Hamilton and Sanders, 2013). These threats, are deeply interconnected and must be viewed within a systemic framework that considers all five sets of intelligences in cities – Contextual, Integral (Individual/Collective), Strategic and Evolutionary.

In keeping with my contemplation of the Nattrass article “How ARE we to go on together: Our Evolutionary Crossroads” I want to consider the story we tell ourselves about climate – and how that story may be increasing the dissonance we (as a species) are experiencing as individuals, organizations, cities and the planet.

I propose that the growing magnitude of this dissonance about climate change is exactly what we need in order to make a significant leap in our collective worldviews about climate change.

The Nattrasses bring this dissonance sharply to mind as they reflect on the increasingly anxious questions that have emerged since our early doubts about human relationship to Nature (a form of Collective Intelligence). They ask (as could our mothers too).

  • Is humanity bankrupting nature?
  • Is humanity on a collision course with the natural world?
  • What is our ecological footprint?
  • What are ecosystem services and how do we calculate their value?
  • Are human activities causing climate change?
  • What are the limits to growth on this planet?
  • Is there a population bomb ticking?
  • Can we meet our needs today and leave enough for future generations to meet theirs as well?
  • What does it mean to overshoot ecological capacity?

 

However, the integral perspective on the cycle of human learning (well explored by Clare Graves) observes that why humans learn depends on precisely their encounters/relationships with dissonance. Without experiencing dissonance we essentially are not motivated to change and so we don’t change!

Many believe that the greatest dissonance the globe faces today is climate change. It is impacting all life forms, including ours. The disturbing situation is though, that we cannot definitively say what is causing climate change? But however, we define the causal equation it appears that human behavior is a contributing factor. And commensurately human intelligence is required to mitigate, adapt and if possible prevent it.

Climate is inescapably a prime element of the habitats in which we live – including and probably especially cities. As individuals we co-exist with our habitats from the smallest personal social scales (Map 2) to the largest Kosmic scales (Map 4, Map 5). Within these inner and outer spectra of human groupings (Map 2) and environmental contexts, we co-create and co-evolve with our habitats.

Earlier in this 21st century cities became the habitats of 50%+ of humanity (90% in developed world). Cities are the most complex human system yet created. As social holons they are complex adaptive systems with potential for orders of learning that magnify the intelligence of any one individual, family, group, organization, sector or neighbourhood. The Nattrasses (2015) point out:

Virtually any [person, team and] organization of any substance has its worldview, its system of intelligibility, rooted firmly in the Old Story. Each operates, and succeeds or fails, within the underlying assumptions found in the Old Story. In turn, individual organizations must still operate within a global system that is also massively embedded in the Old Story.  And in order for any organization to be an influential leader of change for sustainability, it must continue to be successful within the existing Old Story system. Public companies, for example, must continue to show growth and profits, and report them to shareholders every three months, all the while trying to revision and recreate the company and its markets from a sustainability perspective. The task we face is like nothing that has ever taken place in industrial society—it is comparable to rebuilding a jet liner while in flight 10,000 meters above ground.  How do leaders help lead this transformation from inside the very systems that need to change, while at the same time avoiding major economic or social disruptions?

Cities are containers of holons, social holons, relationships, exchanges and emergents – at every scale. As a whole I have long considered them to be a massively complex meshwork. But in practice cities are actually meshworks of meshworks. [See the full definition of meshworking intelligence here.]

The operational values of meshworks in living systems is that they enable a continuous stream of natural, living complex structures to emerge – so that the living system can make the most efficient use of energy by capturing the structures (and infrastructures) that have enabled survival and sustainability; for example this is how all the structures that enable cities to function have emerged – from family hearths, to clans, kingdoms, bureaucracies, businesses social networks, communications systems and global alliances (Map 4). At the same time effective meshworks ensure that background activity never stops self-organizing – thus enabling creative adaptation and emergence (e.g. the activities of inventors, artists, researchers, entrepreneurs, developers, etc.).

This “natural” meshworking capacity of human systems has never been successfully suppressed in the long run, by any governance system, technology or habitat – because the nature of earthly life has ensured that dissonance is always with us – challenging our hierarchies and demanding new solutions for life-threatening problems. But as the Nattrasses point out, the assumptions and worldviews in the Old Story of how cities work, have entrenched the blindness to the impact of human influence on climate change (whatever the cause) into the very organs (organizations) of the living city itself.

The bad news is that cities converge all the problems and potentials of humanity into a vortex of toxic threats. The good news is that cities converge all the problems and potentials of humanity into a spiral of dissonances that trigger the emergence of possibilities and intelligences. (In fact I have suggested that Integral Cities that are alive, resilient and optimized operate with a suite of 12 intelligences (in 5 sets).)

The dissonances caused by climate change challenge all five sets of city intelligences:  Contexting/ Integral – Individual and Collective /Strategic/ Evolutionary.

Integral City Compass

Integral City: 12  Intelligences

As we are waking up to the very real threats of climate change to our cities, our 4 city Voices act like clumsy children who are not yet effective managers of their bio/psycho/cultural/social capacities. As cities we are bumbling around – but, because we are noticing that the Old Story of the mechanical city does not answer all the questions that arise, our dissonances are thrown back in our collective face(s). In other words, our city habitats let us know in very real terms when our learning is not sufficient to the task at hand.

As Brian and Mary Nattrass point out, we have come to a place on this planet where we have never been before. As a species who has hardly reached our teenagehood, we long for parents who might give us another story to explain life.

Rio, Kyoto, Seattle, Copenhagen, Paris

But, cities as the most complex human system we have yet created are discovering that we will have to parent ourselves. One by one cities are learning the hard lessons and bit by bit, we are teaching the human systems within our cities the difficult learning lessons of climate change pioneers. By extension these cities on the early-change bandwagon are beginning to share their hard lessons with our planet of cities – as each becomes ready to learn (i.e. when the dissonance meter gets loud enough, such as happened in New Orleans and Sendai).

As the clarion call for climate change awareness has sounded now for more than a quarter century, the early storytellers of this New Story have despaired at what has seemed collective deafness. They expected nations and organizations to take the lead. But now we see that it is perhaps not surprising that cities have taken the lead, and continue to be at the forefront of storytellers of a different way.

Cities as convergences of human capacities have the most to lose by not addressing climate change. They sit at the nexus points of Earth’s greatest tectonic contractions, water flows, air sheds, food production, energy consumption and material production. And they also concentrate the greatest quantity of evolutionary intelligence to focus on the problems at hand.

Many early adopters have agonized over the apparent resistance of organizations to respond effectively (or at all) to climate change. But by definition successful organizations have not only been anchored in the Old Story – they have verified it, sustained it and perpetuated it (as the Nattrasses noted above).

But with the lenses of complexity, living systems and evolutionary wholeness, we realize that cities are a more complex order of human systems than organizations. Cities are effectively organizations of organizations. And that is why a meshwork (discussed above) is the (fractal) explanation of how they become effective at working together.

So now that our cities have woken up and see strategies for climate change, what role can cities play in changing the story of climate change? More precisely what roles can the 4 Voices of the city working together play in transitioning from the Old Story to the New Story?

Citizens can:

  1. Ask the tough questions
  2. Keep wellbeing in mind
  3. Practise the Master Code

Civic Managers can:

  1. Connect all the systems inside the city and between cities
  2. Take Governance initiatives – defy federal/national/global resistances
  3. Amplify governance initiatives (like Obama’s announcements of US/China Climate Change Agreement)
  4. Emerge the new structure(s) by prototyping and experimenting. (Like Curitiba building the city for people not cars).

Civil Society can:

  1. Convene the intelligence/story challengers/researchers for ongoing forums of discovery (Rio, Kyoto, Seattle, Copenhagen, Paris have not been in vein – each convening has moved the story forward).
  2. Create Metrics and Collect the Indicators – ISO Standard for Cities
  3. Mediate smaller the effectiveness and capacity of all scales – both those smaller than cities such as organizations and those larger scales like nations and the planet itself

Developers, Researchers and Business can:

  1. Prototype change
  2. Align organizations of organizations – learn how to meshwork with intention
  3. Keep the meshwork a living, intentional capacity building process.

A final word from Brian and Mary Nattrass:

In the thousands of years of remembered human histories, it has been expressed in many ways in many times among many peoples that we are that being who lives between Heaven and Earth—ever torn between the god-like qualities of our highest selves and the bestial qualities of our animal selves. Never in our history as a species have we been so urgently called to live and be inspired by the qualities of our better natures; and to grow beyond the tug of our weaker selves. This is a challenge for us as individuals just as much as for our organizations and our society—because ultimately, our organizations and our societies are only expressions of us. So we come now to our evolutionary challenge—the very real challenge of our time. It is the story we are still writing together. It is that socially negotiated story that will ultimately answer the question: How are we to go on together?

It is my contention that key cities are at the stage of evolution where the dissonances they are experiencing have awakened them to being proactive on their own behalf and on behalf of the planet of cities. These cities who are early adopters of the New Integral City story are creating the habitats that will enable us all to go on together.

 

References

Graves, C. (2005). The Never Ending Quest: A Treatise on an Emergent Cyclical Conception of Adult Behavioral Systems and Their Development. Santa Barbara, CA: ECLET Publishing.

Hamilton, M. (2008). Integral City: Evolutionary Intelligences for the Human Hive. Gabriola Island BC: New Society Publishers.

Hamilton, M., & Sanders, B. (2013). Integral City 2.0 Online Conference 2012 Proceedings: A Radically Optimistic Inquiry Into Operating System 2.0 M. Hamilton (Ed.)   Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/120713339/Integral-City-2-0-Online-Conference-2012-A-Radically-Optimistic-Inquiry-into-Operating-System-2-0

Hamilton, M., & etal. (2013). Integral City 2.0 Online Conference 2012 Appendices: A Radically Optimistic Inquiry Into Operating System 2.0 – 36 Interviews M. Hamilton (Ed.)   Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/123005653/Integral-City-2-0-Online-Conference-2012-Appendices-A-Radically-Optimistic-Inquiry-into-Operating-System-2-0-36-Interviews

Nattrass, B., & Nattrass, M. (2015). How ARE We To Go On Together? Our Evolutionary Crossroads. Integral Leadership Review January-February (Canada Issue). Retrieved from http://integralleadershipreview.com/12795-215-go-together-evolutionary-crossroads/

 

This blog is one of a series that explores the relevance and application of ideas to the Integral City, in the articles published in the Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue, 2015, curated and Guest Edited by Marilyn Hamilton.

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Cities are the most complex, diverse, and novel human construction. I love them.

Gaia Whispers

Gaia Whispers

 

At the most basic level, cities are made of zillions of tiny connections:

the interactions of people conducting their lives in them.

It makes me feel so alive!

Exhilarating!

In Humanity’s New Story, city-zens live better when they connect for change on behalf of the city itself.

Integral Cities will have the greatest contribution to the Great Turning[i] when they connect to each other,

generating health and wellness for nations, eco-regions, and for me.

 

Cities are where everything connects to everything else,

poli-laterally.

Look all around, then ask:

Who is able, ready and willing

to connect to whom,

living where,

to change from what to what,

in order to generate value

flowing to which stakeholders,

located where?[ii]

Listen carefully; I’ll be whispering the answers.

~~~

This essay is part of a collection of dialogic essays written to celebrate the New Story of the City. We publish them in the week of the first World Cities Day (October 31) having first been inspired by by Kosmos Journal‘s invitation to tell a new story. Our team of Integral City Constellation Voices, Peer Spirits and Essayists includes: Joan Arnott, Alia Aurami, Cherie Beck, Diana Claire Douglas, Marilyn Hamilton, Linda Shore

The Voices in this dialogue are: Spirit of Integral City, Gaia, Integral City, Peer Spirits, Communities of Practice.

Each  voice is introduced by the Stage Directions:

Welcome, Connecting One(s), to this sapient circle. We gather here to constellate Indra’s Net for our Planet of Cities around this question “How does Integral City Connect for Change in Service to a Planet of Cities?” ( first asked by Kosmos Journal).  Welcome to you, Peer Spirits, who long to connect to the City and her Communities of Practice, to Gaia, and to Spirit who energizes us all. Listen …Gaia speaks …

 

Endnotes

[i] Great Turning by Joanna Macy

[ii] Adaptation of Change Equation developed by Dr. Don Beck, co-author, Spiral Dynamics

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This newsletter is published quarterly using a cycle of perspectives on the Integral City viewed from: Planet, People, Place and Power. The theme of this issue is Place.

… When we consider the complexity of hierarchies and centers that make up a city, it is easy to see why cities represent the pinnacle of human social emergence. With their concentration of human populations in focused time-space continuums, they require the most complex forms of social system management ever created. In addition the translation and transfer of the extensions of human systems into built form demands the most complex form of structural system management ever needed by life. 

Hamilton, M. (2008). Integral City: Evolutionary Intelligences for the Human Hive. Gabriola Island BC: New Society Publishers, p. 158

 

Equinox Reflections on the Tilt of Adaptiveness

Many observers of the human condition suggest that we are naturally resistant to change. Actually I think the exact opposite. The Earth is such a constantly dynamic home, that adaptation derives from our evolutionary lineages and is built right into our histories and daily lives. The combination of the Earth’s rotation around the sun, the presence of our moon, spinning its gravitational pull about the Earth and the axial tilt of the Earth’s spin keep every Earth-based system – including our cities – in constant flux. The September Equinox can serve to remind us of all this fascinating scientific information – or simply be a marker for northern and southern hemispheres, that indicates a shift in how we use that information to adjust our use of energy and matter.  Because during the Equinox the difference in daylight is much greater from one day to the next, in terms of our Places on the planet, the equinoxes seem to be times of far more rapid change in our relationship to the great cycles that impact us through sun, light and seasons. Thus it is not surprising that Equinox times somehow seem to heighten our senses to the “tilts” in our Life Conditions that make themselves known through our food systems and signal oncoming harvest season or spring planting. What’s tilting in your Place on this Planet?.

September Equinox: Thank, Remember, Celebrate Abundant Places

September Equinox opens us into a season of many Thanksgiving celebrations around the world. We remember the Places where we have put down our swords and have taken back our pens and ploughshares. We use the celestial signs to celebrate Islamic New Year, Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival, Hanukkah and Advent. And now we can even “ascend into the heavens” and view not only our home Place, but gain an overview (and overview effect) of the whole ofGoogle Earth from space. Which abundant Places could you thank?

Integral Life PlanetCity2

First World City Day October 31, 2014: Celebrate the Most Complex Human System

Two years ago, writing for Integral Life, I lamented:

When I look around the world at the many days we set aside as celebrations I am struck by a major omission. We celebrate the planet with Earth Day. Most nations celebrate a Nation … We celebrate causes such as Pride Day or recognize health awareness like Heart Month. We have Festival Days that vary with the geography and the season … We have drama festivals, sports festivals and ethnic celebrations … We have parades for Saints …Mother’s Day… and some places even have Family Day. But in a planet of cities, why don’t we have City Day for our individual cities??” (Read the whole article here.)

As if in answer to my plea, UNHabitat has created an opportunity for all cities to celebrate themselves on October 31, 2014. It turns out that, in 2013, the United Nations General Assembly during its Sixty-eighth session designated every 31 October, beginning in 2014 as World Cities Day.

World Cities Day is expected to promote global urbanisation, encourage cooperation among countries in meeting opportunities and addressing challenges in urbanization towards sustainable urban development. Read more about it here.

But I suggest that every city should use World City Day to celebrate itself as an important member of our Planet of Cities – with a parade through the four quadrants of the city, led by core representatives of the 4 City Voices (Citizens, Civic Managers, Civil Society and Business) , enlivened by street parties and culminated with celebrations in all the faith systems of the city (see my article for more details).

Because our cities are now repositories of so much wealth and complexity, they are precious and vulnerable living systems, whose existence deserves to be celebrated. This consciousness can contribute greatly to their future thriving and flourishing.

How will you celebrate your City-Place on October 31? How might you invite others to celebrate?

 

 

What is the Relationship between our Place in the Human Hive and Inner Work?

While in Budapest at the first Integral European Conference (IEC), Marilyn Hamilton was interviewed by Alex Howard of Conscious2 TV. They talked about her book Integral City, and the relationship between city life and inner work. Watch the Video of the interview here.

 

Marilyn Conscious2 re Human Hive

Some key points marked by the interview time include:

2:56 – Honey bees are most intelligent species of invertebrates on tree of life

3:43 – Humans are a very young species

9:44 – The 4 different voices of a city

13:35 – Creating a vision for a city at the grass roots

15:57 – What supports people in engaging more in their community?

18:12 – Agriculture has become an urban experience

20:00 – We have to create the conditions that allow us to align our intelligences

21:20 – We need to create a safe space for people to talk about what is in their hearts

23:40 – Listening is such a gift we can give each other

24:34 – Listen, respect and be open

 

How Does Integral Spiritual and Life Practice Cross-Train Us for Thriving in City Places?

Also at IEC Terry Patten (co-author of Integral Life Practice and a key Thought Leader forIntegral City 2.0 Online Conference) was interviewed by Alex Howard of Conscious2 TV. They explored how Terry sees life as a school that continually gives you the lessons you need until you learn them. Terry explains Integral Life Practice without jargon and comments on the value of “cross-training” the spirit and the body and hanging out with people who stretch your capacity to reflect on self and others. Watch the Video of the interview here.

 

How Can You Facilitate the 4 Voices to Engage and Enrich Place?

Last year we introduced our Learning Lhabitats to encourage the convergence of the 4 Voices of the City. (Read more about Learning Lhabitats here.) In order to strengthen and catalyze these Voices, Integral City has created a scaffold of learning modules to guide Practitioners, Catalysts and Meshworkers to gain skills and knowledge for waking up the “Integral City” that lies dormant in so many Places. This year, we are delighted to let you know about two programs being delivered by Integral City colleagues that further unpack the scaffold.

1. Learn to co-create places where there is just enough chaos to evoke collective wisdom, and just enough order to discover wise action.

This framing for training that engages self, other and places, comes from co-developer of the Learning Lhabitats, Beth Sanders and her team from Populus. They are delivering The Art of Hosting BIG Decisions While Looking After Self, Others and PLACE. This will take placeNovember 25-28, 2014 in Edmonton, Canada.

This program will teach participants how to ground yourself in the artistry of circle to:

Unveil and explore the choices and BIG decisions that you face in your life and work

• Learn hosting practices to engage self, others and places that lead to wise, intentional action

• Advance or evolve to a new level of expertise in leadership and co-creation

• Strengthen your presence and clarify your purpose

 

2. Cultivate authentic presence, clear purpose and agile perspective-taking.

We want to introduce you to our Integral colleagues, Rebecca Colwell, Diane Musho Hamilton, Cindy Lou Golin and Rob McNamara. They are offering the second Integral Facilitator® Certification starting October 29, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Integral Facilitator® is a 9 month professional training program in the advanced competencies of facilitative leadership and masterful facilitation, designed for leaders, facilitators, coaches, trainers and professionals working with groups.

By combining the core skills and techniques of masterful facilitation with leading insights from the fields of developmental psychology, integral theory and mindfulness practices in the Zen tradition, Integral Facilitator® provides core training for self-actualizing individuals who wish to unlock the subtleties of human interaction that can make a difference in waking up the Human Hive. Read details and how to register here.

 

Blog Series for Optimizing Integral City Impact, and Reinventing Cities

In this last quarter I have written 2 Blog series. The first explores the injunctions on Optimizing the Impact of Integral City Practices inspired by Dr. Roger Walsh at Integral Europe Conference; the second taps into the research of author, Frederic Laloux and what Reinventing Organizationssuggests for Reinventing Cities.

Here is a link for the series on Optimizing the Impact of Integral City.

Here is the link for Reinventing Organizations to Reinvent the City.

 

Celebrating “Place-focus” in the Coming Quarter of 2014

September 21 marks the start of what IC is calling the Place Quarter (from September 21 to December 20). What do you think of the new World Cities Day? How do plan to celebrate your city — whether that be as an individual, a family, an organization, a community, a Voice? Or????? We would love to learn from you how we can amplify the celebration of our Planet of Cities. Visit us at Integral City Collective on Face book LINK and post a short update or a photo.

 

Meshful Blessings for September Equinox from

Marilyn Hamilton and the Integral City Core Team

 

PS

Here are some resources for empowering Place in the Human Hive:

1. FREE video of Reinventing Organizations – delivered by Frederic Laloux

2. BY DONATION – download of Reinventing Organizations.

3. Register for the third Integral Living Room Oct 9-12, 2014 – Theme: COSMOS TO KOSMOS: An Integral Spacetime Odyssey. ILR plans to explore an awesome universe governed by natural forces such as gravity and electromagnetism, expanding them into the gravitational pull of goodness, truth and beauty, and the magnetism of attraction and love as forces we can work with to co-create a better world.

4. Download Podcasts of the interviews with the 12 Thought Leaders from Integral City 2.0 Online Conference 2012 (IC2OC). They explored Place through each of the Integral City Intelligences. Podcasts are available here at a 30% discount for Reflective Organ readers. Individual Thought Leaders can be downloaded for $10 each).

 

Newsletter Published Quarterly by Integral City Meshworks Inc.#601-2825 Clearbrook Rd., Abbotsford, BC, V2T6S3. Send us an email if you wish to subscribe to the Newsletter and for occasional updates: newsletter@integralcity.com

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How do you optimize the impact of Integral City impact by getting our work out to the world?

Integral City AQAL

That is the next question that Roger Walsh asked at IEC.

First consider how important integral ideas are at this time in the world.

The city is the most complex system created by humans – and as such it is subject to information overload. Information overload has the tendency to make life very complicated. This causes and amplifies the stress that we feel at every scale in the city – as individuals trying to do our work, as families trying to stay connected, as teams in our work places trying to produce results, as organizations trying to stay on mission, as sectors trying to meet growing demands, as communities trying to engage neighbourhoods, as the whole city, trying to gain an overview of all this complexity to optimize our quality of life, cultural wellbeing, economic prosperity and infrastructural operation .

The value of thinking about the city using an Integral framework – one that can be negotiated with a compass and four maps –  is that it brings alignment and coherence to the many parts of the city. Our Integral City Compass shape shifts into 4 City Maps that help us to situate the dynamics and the patterns that too often elude us with information overload.

The Integral City framework helps us make sense of the cross-currents of our city lives from four directions:

1. how do the winds of change impact us as individuals? (Map 1 and Map 4).

2. how do the conflicts of relationships impact us in our social holons or collectives? (Maps 2, 3, 4)

3. how does the internal environment of Self and Others impact our awareness, beliefs and intentions? (Maps 1, 2 and 3.

4. how does the external environment of Place and Structure impact our actions, performance and capacity to manifest? (Maps 3 and 4).

With the situational guidance offered by compass and maps, Integral City can then support the unfolding of the intelligences that emerge as we optimize our interactions from the four quadrants of the city.

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