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What better way to celebrate Canada Day than to flash the fireworks of July 1 onto the 4 Quadrants of Canada’s cohort of Integral Leaders?

©2014 Aboriginal Nations Education, Greater Victoria School Board, BC, Canada Artist Jamin Zurowski Bear/UL. Wolf /LL. Raven/UR. Salmon/LR.   This Totem is a Gift used with permission on this Canada Issue. Please do reproduce without © Permission.

©2014 Aboriginal Nations Education, Greater Victoria School Board, BC, Canada
Artist Jamin Zurowski
Bear/UL. Wolf /LL. Raven/UR. Salmon/LR.
This Totem is a Gift used with permission on this Canada Issue. Please do reproduce without © Permission.

A whole Quadrivium of Integral Leaders were featured in the Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue at the beginning of 2015. But the plenitude of contributors and the depth of their insights deserves a special reminder today.

Click here to read the Profiles of all the Authors of the Canada Issue – Integral Leadership Review

Here is the Table of Contents in the Canada Issue – with links to all the contributions – including the original 4 Quadrant aboriginal Totem artwork of the Cover (with poetry, thought pieces, research reports, organizational histories, pedagocial principles for teaching leaders, environmental and sustainability insights, inspiring quotations, in-depth interviews … and more):

Cover

1/15 – Cover

Editor

2/15 – Cover

Editor

Leading Comments

1/15 – A Totem for Curating a Story of Leadership in Canada

Marilyn Hamilton

2/15 – From Totem Guides and Lock Masters to World Legacy Light

Marilyn Hamilton

 

Leadership Quote

1/15 – Marshall McLuhan 

2/15 – Adrienne Clarkson, 26th Governor General of Canada (1999-2005)

Lead Poem

1/15 – Lead Poem

Tim Merry

Leadership Coaching Tips

1/15 – Leading Generative Change

Tam Lundy

2/15 – It’s not just what you do, but also how you think!

Natasha Mantler

Fresh Perspective

1/15 – Integral Coaching Canada with Laura Divine and Joanne Hunt

Marilyn Hamilton

2/15 – Dialogic Development: a Conversation with Gervase Bushe

Russ Volckmann

Leading Self

1/15 – Inching Towards Leaderless Leading

Edith Friesen

1/15 – Re-membering My Inherent Wilderness

Beth Sanders

Leading Others

1/15 – Is True Integral Leadership Possible?

Linda Shore

2/15 – Deep Presencing: Illuminating New Territory at the Bottom of the U

Leading Organizations

1/15 – Building Water Leaders and Waterpreneurs

Julia Fortier and Karen Kun

1/15 – Giving birth to Authentic Leadership in Action

Michael Chender

Leading Cultures

1/15 – A Circle of Aiijaakag, a Circle of Maangag: Integral Theory and Indigenous Leadership

Janice Simcoe

Leading World

1/15 – Integral Transformation of Value Chains: One Sky’s Integral Leadership Program in the Brazil Nut Value Chain in Peru and Bolivia

Gail Hochachka

2/15 – How ARE We To Go On Together? Our Evolutionary Crossroads

Brian and Mary Nattrass

Continuous LearningContinuous Learning

1/15 – Integral Dispositions and Transdisciplinary Knowledge Creation

Sue L. T. McGregor

1/15 – The Long and Winding Road: Leadership and Learning Principles That Transform

Brigitte Harris and Niels Agger-Gupta

2/15 – From Practice to Praxis – as Transformative Education: Leading at the Integral/Professional Interface?

Ian Wight

2/15 – Will the Next Buddha be a Sangha? Responding to the Call to Influence the Future of Collaboration

Rebecca Ejo Colwell

Book Reviews

1/15 – The Pulse of Possibility – A Retrospective Review of the Work of Bruce Sanguin

Trevor Malkinson

2/15 – (Re)Joining the Conversation: Commenting on Integral Voices on Sex, Gender, and Sexuality: Critical Inquiries

Diana Claire Douglas

Column

1/15 – Integral Design Leadership: Healthcare Design as Extraordinary Service: An Interview with Peter Jones

Lisa Norton

Poetry Gallery

1/15 – 1. Forgotten Places

Tim Merry

1/15 – 2. What’s It Gonna Take to Stay Awake?

Tim Merry

1/15 – 3. Thank You

Tim Merry

1/15 – 4. Build the Arks (King Kong Song)

Tim Merry

2/15 – 1. The Mother

Tim Merry

2/15 – 2. Human Family Tree

Tim Merry

2/15 – 3. Superman

Tim Merry

2/15 – 4. Switch it on

Tim Merry

Notes from the Field

1/15 – Integral City Development in the Russian City of Izhevsk

Eugene Pustoshkin

 

 

We wish you a Happy Canada Day of Reading and Inspiration – with Gratitude to  all the Integral Leaders in Canada.

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Pope Francis thinks as big as a Planet of Integral Cities.

Pope Francis has gifted the world with a Kosmic view of the environment and the implications for climate change. He instructs the faithful that God has not given dominion to man to dominate the environment but to respect all Life. He explicates what Integral City calls the Master Code – emphasizing that man’s individual expression, must be viewed in relationship to others (particularly those in the developing world and the poor) and nature.

Integral City Thinking

Integral City Thinking

By implication that so many of the poor now live in cities, Pope Francis’ encyclical reveals the inextricable interconnected relationship of cities to their eco-regions and that cities everywhere have an obligation to steward not only the health of people but the health of the environment.

Pope Francis’ sweeping views that marry spirituality and science bring together the inner and outer worlds of peoples everywhere. He explicitly references our need to embrace Beauty and Goodness with our pursuit of Truth.  Without question Pope Francis has opened the door to an explicit Integral Ecology (the name of a whole chapter of the May 2015, Encyclical). In fact, in the May/June 2015 Encyclical on the Environment (now being conflated with the Encyclical on Climate Change) the Pope has used the word “integral” 23 times.

In the future, those of us in the Integral movement may argue, which came first – the  Integral Ecology Book (by Sean Esborn-Hargens and Michael Zimmerman) or Pope Francis’ sensitivity to “Integral Ecology”? But it already seems to me a moot point as Pope Francis has claimed the meme of “Integral Ecology “as core to his argument to value the poor and the environment.

In doing so Pope Francis renews our foundation for Integral City and the 4 Voices that we propose contribute to the survival, resilience and evolution of a Planet of Cities. In fact Pope Francis calls on all 4 Voices to act – whether they be Citizens choosing local food; Civil Society speaking truth to modern developers; City Managers enabling free access to potable water for all; and Business and Developers using technology wisely and growing enterprises organically.

Pope Francis does not equivocate with his warnings to egocentric modern business and calls for them to reinvent themselves with a worldcentric sensibility in thinking and acting on climate change as a planetary issue. In fact he enjoins Catholics and believers of other faiths to make common cause to create an impact (a word he uses 19 times) that can mitigate damage and adapt to change as quickly and as integrally as possible.

Many of Pope Francis’ points to make impact resonate with our series “How to Optimize Integral City Impact” (inspired by Roger Walsh’s 2014 Keynote at IEC). In this set of blogs we framed optimizing injunctions for the implementation and impact of Integral City Principles:

  1. How to Optimize the Impact of Integral City Work
  2. How to Optimize Integral City Impact Through Adult Development
  3. How to Optimize Integral City Impact by Getting Ideas Out Into the World
  4. How to Optimize Impact of Integral City Work from Direct Experience & Deep Wisdom
  5. How to Optimize Integral City Impact through Transconventional Religion
  6. How to Optimize Integral City Impact with Community of Practice
  7. How to Optimize Integral City Impact as Spiritual Practice
  8. How to Optimize Integral City Impact as Accomplice to the Divine

Now is the time for all good people to come to the support of our sister/mother Earth (as Pope Francis calls our planetary home) to optimize our impact on our Planet of Cities enacting the Master Code:

Take Care of Your Self

Take Care of Each Other

Take Care of this Place/Planet.

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Pope Francis is calling for an ecological reframing for the faithful in his sweeping new encyclical on the environment. In “Laudato Si,” or “Be Praised” (or “Praised Be,”). He addresses issues that individuals must take responsibility for, as well as larger collectives – including cities.

Pope Francis warns of harming nature, the costs of industrial pollution, resource waste and he calls for renewable fuel subsidies and energy efficiency.

banner_06 globe aus-pacific

The following article was posted by Sarah Pulliam, Washington Post,June 20, 2015

Here are some of the key passages people will read closely, everything from climate change and global warming to abortion and population control.

1) Climate change has grave implications. “Each year sees the disappearance of thousands of plant and animal species which we will never know, which our children will never see, because they have been lost forever,” he writes.

2) Rich countries are destroying poor ones, and the earth is getting warmer. “The warming caused by huge consumption on the part of some rich countries has repercussions on the poorest areas of the world, especially Africa, where a rise in temperature, together with drought, has proved devastating for farming.”

3) Christians have misinterpreted Scripture and “must forcefully reject the notion that our being created in God’s image and given dominion over the earth justifies absolute domination over other creatures.”

4) The importance of access to safe drinkable water is “a basic and universal human right.”

5) Technocratic domination leads to the destruction of nature and the exploitation of people, and “by itself the market cannot guarantee integral human development and social inclusion.”

6) Population control does not address the problems of the poor. “In the face of the so-called culture of death, the family is the heart of the culture of life.” And, “Since everything is interrelated, concern for the protection of nature is also incompatible with the justification of abortion.”

7) Gender differences matter, and “valuing one’s own body in its femininity or masculinity is necessary if I am going to be able to recognize myself in an encounter with someone who is different.”

8) The international community has not acted enough: “recent World Summits on the environment have not lived up to expectations because, due to lack of political will, they were unable to reach truly meaningful and effective global agreements on the environment.” He writes, “the Church does not presume to settle scientific questions or to replace politics. But I am concerned to encourage an honest and open debate so that particular interests or ideologies will not prejudice the common good.” And, “there is urgent need of a true world political authority, as my predecessor Blessed John XXIII indicated some years ago.”

9) Individuals must act. “An integral ecology is also made up of simple daily gestures which break with the logic of violence, exploitation and selfishness,” he writes. We should also consider taking public transit, car-pooling, planting trees, turning off the lights and recycling.

10) By the way, why are we here on Earth in the first place? “What kind of world do we want to leave to those who come after us, to children who are now growing up?” he writes.

Read the original of this article here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2015/06/18/10-key-excerpts-from-pope-franciss-encyclical-on-the-environment/

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Out beyond the smart city, out beyond the resilient city,

Lives the Integral City.

Integral City Thinking

Integral City Thinking

Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue offered a Leadership Tip on Generative Change, by Tam Lundy, that acted as a Guide to appreciating all the articles. Tam’s Tip gave the reader an energy boost as you passed through the Totem Entry Way to help you focus and harvest the significance of each and all the leadership contributions on offer in the issue.

Tam’s ideas on Technical, Adaptive and Generative Change offered particularly cogent recommendations for global cities – whether they be Smart, Resilient or Integral.

Smart Cities tend to use technical solutions to address first order change. As identified by Spiral Dynamics, first order change requires support for maintaining, adjusting or improving the status quo. (Think more data banks, driverless cars, faster Wi-Fi.)

Resilient Cities tend to use adaptive solutions that address mid-order change. As identified by Spiral Dynamics, such change addresses systemic adaptations, mitigations and restorations.  (Think urban food security, reduction of greenhouse gases, daylighting streams.)

Integral Cities seek to generate solutions that meet second-order change. As identified by Spiral Dynamics, these changes address a greater order of magnitude of problems than has ever been encountered before. (The military have dubbed these kinds of circumstances as VUCAvolatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous). Approaches to “VUCA-stances” demand that city leaders open up new mindsets, redefine city paradigms, and emerge new potentials for living systems not yet dreamed or tried. (Think cities as Gaia’s Reflective Organs, city as human hive, Planet of Cities as collective intelligence network.)

Integral City leaders use both Smart and Resilient solutions – in their appropriate contexts. In fact Generative Change approaches enable Integral City thinking to emerge – because they include and build on both Smart and Resilient Solutions – and step into a zone where they can act effectively to align first order technical problems with Smart City solutions and mid-order adaptive problems with Resilient City Solutions.

But Integral City leaders go beyond merely aligning technical and adaptive solutions and seek to discover for their cities how to align the very source of City Wellbeing, with City Purpose, Collective Vision and Strategies for thriving.

Leaders who follow Lundy’s Generative Change Tip, venture out beyond the smart city, out beyond the resilient city, into the Integral City. They create a Field … we can meet them there.

References:

Beck, D., & Cowan, C. (1996). Spiral Dynamics: Mastering Values, Leadership and Change. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers.

Hamilton, M. (2008). Integral City: Evolutionary Intelligences for the Human Hive. Gabriola Island BC: New Society Publishers.

This blog is one of a series that explores the relevance and application of ideas to the Integral City, in the articles published in the Integral Leadership Review – Canada Issue, 2015, curated and Guest Edited by Marilyn Hamilton.

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International \Organization for Standards (ISO) has announced a new standard for quality of life in cities.

In London, UK on November 17-18, 2014, ISO in conjunction the World Council on City Data (WCCD) launches the  the first international standard for sustainable cities, ISO 37120: Sustainable development of communities — Indicators for city services and quality of life.

Working with cities who want a standard created by and for cities, WCCD and ISO 37120 have announced an initial suite of 46 indicators.  These indicators, enable the 4 Voices of the City, to access objective, verified (by auditors) vital signs (aka indicators) to to compare services and performance levels with other cities around the world. Civic managers (generally the policy makers in the city) can now be held accountable by citizens, businesses and civil society organizations by using the ISO 37120 standards as a tool that is  evidence based and annually updated.

ISO lists the benefits of the standard for cities as providing:

• More effective governance and delivery of services
• Local and international benchmarking and planning
• Informed decision making for policy makers and city managers
• Learning across cities
• Recognition by international entities
• Leverage for funding by cities with senior levels of government
• Framework for sustainability planning
• Transparency and open data for investment attractiveness

The WCCD has identified 20 foundation cities who have agreed to adopt ISO 37120 and help build the WCCD, basing its initial set of indicators on 17 Themes.

 

As we have written elsewhere, for an Integral City, key city indicators must be balanced amongst the four quadrants and based on the city as a living, complex adaptive system. While at least one of the key indicators we have been tracking since our Integral City 2.0 Online Conference is missing (Food) – we think this looks like a promising start with proxies for all the quadrants in place. Moreover, the 20 foundation cities are distributed around the world, so that they will seed the growth of the indicators in different geographies and cultures. (Bogotá, Guadalajara, Boston, Toronto, London, Barcelona, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Helsinki, Arnman, Dubai, Makkah, Minna, Johannesburg, Haiphong, Shanghai, Makati, Melbourne).

Kudos to the working teams at WCCD and all the cities who have participated!!!

Key information in this blog was gleaned from Meeting of the Minds, webinar on New Urban Indicators for City Services and Quality of Life  http://cityminded.org/cal/new-urban-indicators-city-services-quality-life

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What can I do to optimize Integral City Impact? We ask the question again – as an honoured contemplative practice to repeat the question as a doorway to yet deeper knowing.

 

Integral City Map 5: Spirituality in the Human Hive

Integral City Map 5: Spirituality in the Human Hive

Our spiritual guide in this series of Optimizing Impact has been Dr. Roger Walsh. He pointed out (at IEC) that we can seek to answer this question with a one-time answer from our knowledge base.

But when we treat this question as a Wisdom Query, it becomes a kind of koan, that takes us deeper into ourselves/Self and reality.

As intentional Practitioners we are called to develop the expertise to do three things:

  1. We can relieve external problems to the best of our ability as “barefoot doctors” or “Spiral Wizards”.
  2. We can heal the internal sources of problems in our own psyche, the anguish of others, or across cultural divides. As we widen our circle of compassion, we are more able to be the non-anxious presence who can offer a calm and grounded centre to be with others in difficult circumstances.
  3. We can bring more integral and Integral City frames to bear on the work we do.

As pioneers of a new paradigm for the city we engage spirituality in multiple contexts – in our personal reflective practice; in the work place; in our communities (of practice and place); and on behalf of the city as a whole. (It is the territory of Map 5 for the Integral City.)

Integral frameworks are now emerging in most domains of human understanding (including psychology, medicine, education, sexuality, history, geography, systems, culture). Thus we are recalibrating our ability to design habitats for wellbeing and relieve dis-ease in all its manifestations.

An integral mindset is able to flex and flow in a stream of awareness that opens eventually into a transcendental awareness, where spirituality in the Human Hive is an alive re-sourceful condition.

What I can do to optimize Integral City impact, then comes down to choosing a path of never-ending maturing. It means, according to Dr. Walsh, that we regularly dive into inner work as deeply as we can. He calls it “karma yoga” – where our work in the world of Integral Cities becomes a spiritual practice itself. It is the manifestation of our Master Code: Take Care of Yourself, so that you can Take Care of Each Other, so we can Take Care of this Place, so we can Take Care of this Planet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mom always used to say, “be careful of the company you keep”. Transpersonal psychologist, Integral pioneer and wise elder, Dr. Roger Walsh, at IEC, emphasized the importance of the company you keep, to support your Integral spiritual practice. By gathering with, for and as the people who embrace the paradigms of evolutionary consciousness and culture, complexity and living systems we amplify the Field of Integral Practice.

That is why Integral City and its growing Community of Practice produce, support, present and attend the conferences that enable us to keep company with Thought Leaders, Designers and Practitioners who demonstrate the 12 Intelligences of Integral City.

Gaia's Reflective Organs? (Image from Chihuly Glass Gallery Seattle)

Gaia’s Reflective Organs? (Image from Chihuly Glass Gallery Seattle)

 

The wave of integrally informed or designed conferences, where Integral City has contributed has become a movable feast,  travelling from Perpignan, France (Renaissance II gatherings in 2009, 2010); to  San Francisco (the locale of three Integral Theory Conferences in 2008, 2010, 2013); to Budapest (venue for the Integral Europe Conference 2014); to Haiphong, Vietnam (city for the International Society for Systems Science 2013); to Izhevsk, Russia (location for Urbanfest, 2014); and  the ubiquitous internet (with our own Integral City 2.0 Online Conference, 2012).

Integral City Meshworkers (like Beth Sanders, Roberto Bonilla, Lev Gordon, Anne-Marie Voorhoeve, Diana Claire Douglas) bring special expertise to other gatherings in their local cities where city planning, organizational development, city development, transorganizational collaboration and systemic constellation work expand the influence of integral paradigms into families, teams, sectors, economic sectors, neighbourhoods and eco-regions.

As Reflective Integral City Practitioners our contributions to gatherings – whether they be local or global — help to heal a troubled world because we offer options for noticing more possibilities for healing conflict (from all 4 quadrants), processes for decision making that embrace all 4 Voices of the city, laboratories for learning (like Learning Lhabitats), technology for research (like values mapping and vital signs monitors) and principles for expanding circles of compassion (Master Code).

Situating and modeling, Integral thinking, acting, relating and creating, as it relates to human systems in the City, we bring “Mohammed to the mountain”. Because cities are the places where most humanity now lives (50% in developing world to 90% in the developed world) it makes sense that we take advantage of the greatest opportunity for leverage offered to Integral practitioners. As Thomas Huebl takes the ashram to the market place, he is recognizing the intersection point of the world’s greatest needs – to solve all the major problems created by humanity with humanity’s greatest purpose – to be Gaia’s Reflective Organ.

Integral City Practitioners, Catalysts and Meshworkers are learning how their skills can address our current evolution as a species – where  the individual and collective immaturity and psychological pathologies of humans threatens the existence of all Life on the globe.

Integralists are called to address the psychological and pathological immaturities and disruptive pathologies of individuals, groups and institutions that we have the lenses to see from all four quadrants of: intentions (UL), behaviours (UR), cultures (LL) and systems (LR).

Flocking together with other Integralists at conferences, city gatherings and working on projects, enables Integral City’s Community of Practice to amplify our capacities to not only embrace the great efforts of the Smart City, and the Resilient City but transcend and include them into the Integral City and Indra’s web of our planet’s cities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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